poetry

quiet spaces

By Amy Thomson

Souls bound,
found pieces of my own
thrown under friend’s car seats,
dropped in side-streets,
wrapped in bedsheets
askew.

Places
like spaces between words
in loyal paperbacks,
in sidewalk cracks,
baggage unpacked,
I’m new.

Spotted
blue dotted between leaves,
ancient thread in Earth’s sleeves
weaves me to you,
a deja vu
soul glue.

Restored
by the cord that fastens
wild Pines to Aspens,
magic happens
in hazel pools
of two.

 

 

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poetry

Mousetrap

By Amy Thomson

First impression,
confession: smitten,
fangs bit in,
venom dopamine,
first serene,
then you got mean,
razor tongue cut my folly so quick,
you’re sick,
trick your prey
to come play,
I pray
you recover,
discover that
you’re prettier smiling.
Filing moments
before we were opponents,
components of misery simple.
Into your mousetrap,
bones snap,
heart slap,
they’ll lap
your lies.

 

poetry

Lebensmüde

By Amy Thomson

Three-twenty-two am,
memories stem from dusty corners
long forgotten,
gone rotten,
like fruit left in sixth grade lockers,
she walks her skinny legs
home.
Porcelain bowl
full of that night’s dinner,
getting thinner,
she’s the winner
and the sinner.
Years of tears,
then high school years
of Pepsi for lunch,
tomato to munch,
stomach to crunch,
walls to punch.
“Where’s your food?” he asks.
Her mask taut,
“I forgot.”

 

poetry

Field Tending

By Amy Thomson

 

Construction booms
shake the rooms,
rattling, rumbling, reverberating,
perforating the hour.
Deliberating the ultimate power:
Time,
how to slice it just right,
keeping future in sight.
Still learning from the past,
too late to cast
necessary wisdom,
intoxicating system
breeding bees
to make cheese
a tight squeeze
in the schedule,
a sexy tease,
a little hair pull.
Clumps of hair drown the drain
the wicked pain
of lost dreams,
blown away with kites,
a bittersweet sight,
aspartame bite.
Can barely find time to breathe
without choking on guilt.
The Empire we’ve built
starts to wilt.
Time caresses valleys around
Mother’s eyes
regrets disguised
as her children’s tears dried,
refused rides,
became brides,
she tried
her best.
The red giant will still
set in the West,
even after we’ve gone,
The East will bear dawn.